Ever17 Anniversary Uchikoshi & Nakazawa Interview Part 2 (Spoiler)

*This is an unofficial interview with Ever17 original concept/scenario writer Kotaro Uchikoshi, and director Takumi Nakazawa. Please note that the views expressed in this interview are Mr. Uchikoshi and Mr. Nakazawa’s own, and do not reflect the views of any related organizations or copyright holders of Ever17.

Warning: The following interview contains major spoilers for Ever17. Anyone who has not completely finished Ever17 is advised to turn back now to avoid spoilers.

#1. What meanings went into the title “Ever17”? Why was 17 chosen as the focal number for this story?

Nakazawa:

“Ever” means “once before” and “someday”. This was a work that crosses over past and future, so that word was chosen. As for the number 17, Uchikoshi chose it. I believe that it’s a reference to the story (the 17 year time gap).

Uchikoshi:

I haven’t told Nakazawa this once for the last 16 years, but the truth is, it’s because my birthday is on the 17th. You might think I’m joking, but I’m dead serious. I liked the number 17. That’s the only reason behind its origin.

Nakazawa:

Whaaaaaat!?!? Are you serious? Hold on, you’re joking, right? I knew your birthday was on the 17th, but I just thought it was a coincidence. So that’s what started it all…

#2. Many people were shocked that there was a whole 17 year gap between the two routes. What effort went into carrying out that twist, and aside from tying into the title, why was a 17 year gap chosen?

Uchikoshi:

Mmm, this is essentially two questions in one. Let’s start with the first one, “what effort went into carrying out that twist”… Truth is, not as much effort was needed here when compared to other works. Attempting to make the main trick work in normal works usually has a bad habit of bending the plot to head in certain ways, patch up any broken spots with story, only for your plot to end up with a grotesque, cobbled-up shape, but that didn’t happen in Ever17. Rather, it was the opposite: the story mended itself up, almost like Ever17 was a living creature. We just casually wrote the story with no real plan or scheme in mind, and while reinforcing and supplementing the other weak parts of the story, it just automatically made itself convincing. This was the “inductive composition method” I mentioned earlier. With Ever17, we didn’t need to forcefully bend the plot: simply by writing each ordinary day on its own, the trick just worked by itself: an extremely rare work indeed. There is no real secret for me to disclose… It’s a simple trick that can be explained in one sentence. “The entropy was really tiny”. That sentence means the exact opposite of “death” (confusion). That’s why I find it elegant. So with Ever17, the trick just worked on its own by us writing each ordinary day on its own. Truth be told, as a writer, it was a work that didn’t require any mystery talents or techniques (each writer was amazing, but that’s not what I mean), so let’s move on. As for “aside from tying into the title, why was a 17 year gap chosen?”, I’ll answer that one in #18.

Nakazawa:

In fact, I felt it took more effort to make the reveals convincing when they came to light, rather than hiding them. Like casually adding in some moments of discomfort. Examples such as “Tsugumi being more paranoid in the Kid’s perspective (because she already knew the result of Takeshi’s perspective)”, “Somewhat different events happening in the Kid’s perspective (because a perfect recreation would have been impossible)”, “The Takeshi (Kaburaki) in the Kid’s perspective acting suspiciously from time to time”, and so on. By adding in hooks hinting at the truth rather than forcefully bending the plot to hide it, it might have paradoxically made readers not realize it, or make them think “oh, this must be a slip-up on the scenario writer’s part”.

#3. Were there any major revisions made to the overall plot, story, or characters during production?

Uchikoshi:

I get the feeling the Coco’s Route was greatly changed, but I don’t really remember much of what and how…

#4. When creating a game series, it is always important to keep things both fresh and familiar for fans of the series. How did you try to maintain this policy for Ever17 so as to create a different and yet nostalgic atmosphere from Never7?

Uchikoshi:

At that time, I was a fan of the novels “Ring”, “Spiral”, and “Loop” (all by author Koji Suzuki), which are also a series. However, unlike most series, though these books use the same setting, they all have completely different genres: “Ring” is horror, “Spiral” is bio-suspense, “Loop” is sci-fi… I really liked this sort of writing ingenuity, and while it is Koji Suzuki’s invention to a certain extent, I think it had a strong influence on Never7 and Ever17. For example, with Curé Syndrome and the Curé Virus. Also, while in a different direction, I feel it is similar to “Alien/Aliens” and “The Terminator/Terminator 2: Judgment Day” as well. Those were the kinds of works we referenced while making Ever17.

Nakazawa:

Also, in order to throw off players who’d read Never7 (tricking them in a good way), we put in implications that could be interpreted as “after Takeshi’s Routes, time travel occurred and the same events repeated, resulting in the Kid’s Routes.” Details that would trick even players of the previous game, so to speak. Also, we threw in some fanservice by throwing out terms and character names from Never7 to create a nostalgic feeling. An ideal series is one where each work can be enjoyed on its own, and where players of the previous story will find it much more interesting as a result.

#5. The twist that the Kid was not the character we thought we’d been playing as sure was a shock. What were the difficulties involved in doing such a twist like that, as well as keeping Takeshi’s true appearance a secret until the end?

Uchikoshi:

As stated above, actually writing it wasn’t all that difficult. Explaining it to the rest of the staff when presenting the proposal was harder. “Uh, so you see, the truth is, this isn’t the real Takeshi’s face…” “Come again?”. Also, it was surprisingly tricky to keep the protagonist’s true forms from appearing in the event CGs.

Nakazawa:

Indeed. Directing the CG creation was a matter of trial-and-error, because we needed to figure out how “to make sure never to show their faces (keeping Takeshi in Takeshi’s perspective and the Kid’s face in the Kid’s perspective out of the frame) in a natural way that doesn’t attract attention”. Also, we had to make it so that “whenever they are in the frame, don’t lie” so that players playing through a second time would enjoy it. For Takeshi’s perspective, that involved giving Takeshi blackish hair (while Kaburaki’s hair was brown), and in the Kid’s perspective, making Hokuto’s clothes grey (while Kaburaki’s were blue). We were fixed on being fair to the players.

#6. Ever17 is considered to have a powerful sense of mental and emotional catharsis at the end, especially with the reveal of the mysteries and the Epilogue. Was this sort of catharsis considered the goal of writing, or a side-effect of the story?

Uchikoshi:

Naturally, the story’s catharsis was planned from the start, but the Epilogue was not actually in the plot. Genius director Nakazawa said “you have to put one in!”, and so I spent about three days writing it up. Of course, it turned out to be a great success. In fact, if there wasn’t an epilogue, I don’t think Ever17 would have been as well received as it was. There’s three things I want to say:

#1: Take others’ advice seriously.

#2: A mere three days of work can change your life.

#3: Nakazawa’s advice is always right on the mark.

Nakazawa:

#4: Scenario writers who take advice seriously and write something that exceeds expectations in such a short amount of time are the true geniuses.

#7. What were some specific influences on Ever17?

Uchikoshi:

There were quite a lot of them. Just to name a few, “Tertium Organum (by P.D. Ouspensky)”, “Jin-Roh: The Wolf Brigade (Directed by Hiroyuki Okiura, Written by Mamoru Oshii”, “Ring/Spiral/Loop (by Koji Suzuki)”, and so on.

Nakazawa:

“Resident Evil”, “The Abyss”, and “Cube” had an influence on the setting and the background art. Also, I remember Uchikoshi saying that the movie “Frequency” gave him a hint for the scene in Coco’s Route where Takeshi and Hokuto communicate.

#8. Do either of you have a particularly favorite scene from Ever17?

Uchikoshi:

It wasn’t something I wrote, but probably Mr. Sasanari’s “I’m sick of sandwiches!” scene. Whenever I come across Ever17 fans, they always say that to me. Also, the overlapping hands on the glass scene with Sora too… Oh, that one was my idea.

Nakazawa:

The overlapping hands on the glass scene with Sora sure was nice. Also, I like the scene in Coco’s Route where Coco’s on the Kosmisher Wal and jokes “Mr. Whale, what time is it? A whale of a time!”

(Interviewer’s note: In the original Japanese, the joke was “Mr. Whale (kujira), what time is it? It’s kuji(nine o’clock)ra!”)

I remember that one from time to time for some reason. Now that I think about it, that was the last line Uchikoshi wrote, wasn’t it?

#9. With four scenario writers (yourselves, Mr. Sasanari, and Mr. Umeda) involved in a story where continuity is greatly important, how did you ensure continuity was maintained between the writers? What about quality control? What other challenges are involved in a story-heavy VN like this with multiple writers, and were there any particular problems in Ever17’s writing?

Uchikoshi:

Nakazawa, Mr. Sasanari, and Mr. Umeda are all very good writers, but as stated above, it wasn’t all that difficult to make the mystery work… So maintaining continuity wasn’t as important as everyone thinks. I think that I did supervise the scenario during quality checking. As for the last question, I’ll field that to Nakazawa.

Nakazawa:

In general, when you have multiple writers, you’ll get a lot of plot contradictions and parts that don’t feel right. When you have multiple people writing all at once, conflicting parts are inevitable. So you might be wondering why multiple writers are used if they have that downside to them, but it’s simply because production time is short. When you have a long development time, it’s decided that it would be best to have one person write the whole thing. So to get rid of that downside, all you can do is have the main scenario writer supervise all the scenarios and adjust when necessary. Even in Ever17, there were some contradictions and parts that didn’t feel right between the scenarios. Of course, each scenario writer had the responsibility of understanding the setting, took meticulous care in writing, and finally had Uchikoshi supervise the scenarios at the end and adjust them when necessary. However, unlike ordinary VNs, I don’t remember many “fatal contradictions/parts that didn’t feel right” appearing. As said in a previous answer, “it was the opposite: the story mended itself up, almost like Ever17 was a living creature. We just casually wrote the story with no real plan or scheme in mind, and while reinforcing and supplementing the other weak parts of the story, it just automatically made itself convicing.” In other words, even when contradictions occurred, the other parts of the setting naturally supported and counterbalanced each other. Also as stated previously, “I felt it took more effort to make the reveals convincing when they came to light, rather than hiding them. Like casually adding in some moments of discomfort.”. To put it another way, things that would normally be contradictions or moments of discomfort in any other game instead functioned as foreshadowing this time around. Even to this day, I feel that Ever17 was a miraculous work in that sense.

#10. Ever17 had a different cover for every version (for example, the Dreamcast version featured You and Kid, the PS2 version featured Coco, and the PC version featured all the main heroines). What was the creation and selection process involved for each of those covers? Did you have a particular favorite?

(Interviewer’s note: the following contains a major spoiler for the movie “Saw”.)

Uchikoshi:

My favorite cover was the one where “Sara had six fingers”. See, this is what I mean when I say Ever17 was possessed by God… I’m quite ashamed to say that about my own work, though… I mean, would you ever normally instruct someone to draw six fingers? No, in fact, it was just a simple mistake on character designer Ms. Takigawa’s part, but in-game, there is a bit where a sixth finger is mentioned, so it does feel like there’s a bit of synchronicity about that part, doesn’t it? Ms. Takigawa’s father is an artist, and she told him about the sixth finger. “I must really be in a slump to make a careless mistake like that”, or something like that. However, her father then encouraged her by saying “works with unintentional mistakes like that sell better”… And this was before Ever17 became famous. Amazing, Mr. Takigawa!

(Interviewer’s note: The cover Mr. Uchikoshi is describing was used for the original PS2 release of Ever17.)

Nakazawa:

Oh yes, I remember that! The one that left the deepest impression on me was the cover used for the PS2 Premium Edition featuring “the real Takeshi and Tsugumi”.

(Interviewer’s note: this cover was also used as the cover for the second disc box in the official English release of Ever17.)

By the time I placed in the instructions for the Premium Edition cover, I was running out of ideas, and after thinking it over and over, I thought “All right! I’ll use a spoiler just this once! Let’s just casually throw something we took great care into hiding right out there on the front!”. Just like how people let things in the Kid’s perspective slide no matter how out of place they felt, I figured they wouldn’t pay much attention to something so bluntly thrown out there. In more extreme terms, something that wouldn’t leave an impression- just like how no one who watched “Saw” thought that the corpse (or rather, the man pretending to be a corpse) lying in the middle of the room was the real culprit. What’s more, part of the real culprit’s background was the blatant hint he “liked watching from the front row”. It was for that reason (*”Saw” was released in 2004. The PS2 Premium Edition was released in 2003. “Saw” didn’t actually have any influence on the cover, I was just using it as a similar example) I thought it’d be fresh and interesting. Besides, the players (probably) wouldn’t realize that it was a spoiler. Confident, I asked for the PS2 Premium Edition to show the “real Takeshi”, and for the Dreamcast Premium Edition to show the “real Kid (Hokuto)”. The PS2 version had Takeshi drawn blatantly up and in the front, while the Dreamcast version had Hokuto drawn from the back. And the result… was horribly bashed… Hokuto on the Dreamcast version was mostly ignored, but players who had already played the game went into an uproar when they saw Takeshi on the PS2 version. Criticisms like “whoever was responsible for this should die in atonement”. Disparaged by people who said this was the work of some amateur who didn’t understand a thing about Ever17. There were even those who said that version should be recalled and redrawn. I felt very strange about that. “Why all this uproar? Of course people who already played it would notice, but people who haven’t shouldn’t even have considered it (that the Takeshi in the Kid’s perspective was a different person)”, “The bigger the fuss they make, the likelier it is that people who haven’t played the game will hear about it”. But in the end, it seems most players who hadn’t played it before didn’t understand why those who had already played the game were complaining, and were able to enjoy the game normally. In fact, I heard stories about those who finished the game and were like, “Oh! The answer was just lying on the cover the whole time!” with surprise. When I heard of those, I was reminded of the old Japanese comedians “Drifters”. The comedian Shimura had an act where he would be on stage as something dangerous approached him from behind, but he never noticed. The audience members watching it would try to warn him by shouting “Shimura! Look out behind you!”. In this metaphor, Shimura is “the players who hadn’t played Ever17 yet”, the danger is “the spoiler (that the man on the cover is the real Takeshi)”, the audience is “players who already played Ever17”, and their shouts are “their well-intentioned complaints about not spoiling them”. In most cases, just like the skit itself, the players didn’t notice the spoiler until the very end, and were able to enjoy it the whole way through. They would look at the cover afterwards and be like “they got me!”. If Shimura had accidentally paid attention to the shouts and turned around to notice the danger… then the skit would fall flat. Well, I hadn’t predicted that much from the very start, though… At any rate, that cover consisting of a superb and dangerous balance left a very deep impression to me.

#11. Now then, let’s discuss the ideas, development, and role of the game’s characters. First off, let’s talk about Tsugumi Komachi.

Uchikoshi:

I was a big fan of the movie “Interview with the Vampire”, so at first, I conceived of Tsugumi as being a vampire. However, that idea was received poorly by the staff, so all that remained of the idea in the end was the whole “immortality” part, thus giving way to the character of Tsugumi. After that, while I was conceiving the plot, I came up with the idea of the Curé Virus. In other words, through the complete opposite composition method I normally come up for scenarios. Instead of going Curé Virus->immortality, I came up with the immortality background first, and then the Curé Virus after to support it; according to the “inductive composition method”. Incidentally, Tsugumi’s name is written with the characters for “moon” and “sea”. If you reverse that order, you get the Japanese word for “jellyfish”, but at the time, I don’t think I was aware of the immortal jellyfish. This was another case where the order was reversed? Scared now? Well, there’s still more mysterious phenomena caused by the “inductive composition method” that you have yet to see…

#12. Next, let’s discuss Sora Akanegasaki.

Uchikoshi:

Sora’s knowledge was planned to be from an AI from the start. But robots were clichéd, and holograms couldn’t be displayed in random places with the technology back then. Though I think that’d be hard to accomplish nowadays too… Anyway, so I thought “then why not display her as an image directly shot into people’s eyes via a laser or something?”… Next, I thought, “If some ordinary guy like me thought that up, then I’m sure there’s some expert out there who’s already making that technology a reality!”, so I went to searching the internet, using keywords like “retina  image  laser”… And sure enough, there really was technology like that: RSD (Retinal Scanning Display). This was also an effect of the “inductive composition method”: I didn’t know about RSD at first; I thought of the technology, then looked up the name of the real-world mechanism. This is really off-topic, but when I was writing Ever17, I thought: “Because Sora’s an image directly projected into the retinas, the background behind Sora’s body would definitely look transparent…” That concerned me quite a bit for a long while and bugged me. However, recently, I got to experience Microsoft’s HoloLens and was astonished. It’s like a type of AR, but the background didn’t look transparent at all! It was a different story when looking at a fluorescent lamp or places with natural light, but at the very least, in normal places with indoor lighting, the background barely looked transparent at all. I feel like we’ve taken another step closer to making Sora a reality.

#13. Let’s talk about You Tanaka: both Harukana and Akikana.

Uchikoshi:

The idea of clones was already fairly common at the time. We even used it in Never7. However, as far as I know, I feel Ever17 is the only work that has ever done “giving birth to your own clone”. Well, I’m sure I’d find one if I looked hard enough… Anyway, with her case, I prioritized coming up with her background first. The names “Yubiseiharukana” and “Yubiseiakikana” came from a girls’ name dictionary: apparently, they’re real names. Incidentally, the people at the sales department of the company said “this name is too lame! Change it!”, apparently. But then genius director Nakazawa famously rejected them by saying “Oh no, this name has a very important meaning to it, so we can’t change it!”.

#14. Next, we have Sara Matsunaga.

Uchikoshi:

I think I came up with the Kid’s background first, and only later made Sara his fraternal twin sister. All the other character backgrounds had a lot of detail to them, so I felt that having only Sara as a normal girl would offset that balance. But thanks to that, I think it gave scenes with Tsugumi more depth, and made the work as a whole a lot better. Incidentally, as for having infrared vision to see objects in the dark, that was a leftover from her mother Tsugumi’s original vampire background.

#15. For the final heroine, we have Coco Yagami.

Uchikoshi:

Coco was the central character of the final route, so from the start, I had planned to make her like a “mysterious character who knew all the truths”. However, I hadn’t planned for her to “be left behind at the bottom of the sea 17 years ago and need saving” during the plotting stages. I think I only came up with that during the actual writing stage.

#16. Finally, let’s go over the main three male characters: Takeshi Kuranari, Hokuto, and Ryogo Kaburaki.

Uchikoshi:

Hmm, let’s see… I don’t really have anything to write… I’ll field this to Nakazawa!

Nakazawa:

Hey, that’s not fair. Hmm… hmm… Takeshi and Hokuto’s concept and roles didn’t change all that much from the initial draft. What did change was Takeshi getting infected with the Curé Virus at the end, I suppose… Oh, then let’s talk about personalities. The two of them had opposing personalities: Takeshi was a “assertive/optimistic, athletic, hot-blooded fool”, while Hokuto was a “introverted, negative, and cowardly, but nice boy”. Takeshi, who had a past, but lost his future (sleeping at the bottom of the ocean), and Hokuto, who lost his past through amnesia, but desperately lived for the future: Takeshi, who lived in the past, and Hokuto, who lived in the future… Their environments and ways of life were opposites. “In order to perceive our three-dimensional world properly, humans need two eyes.”. You said something like that in the story, I believe. In that case, in order to accurately see through the world, that means two differing perspectives are necessary. That would be Takeshi and Hokuto, two different perspectives with different personalities, environments, ways of life, and positions in the story. The truth of the mysteries of the virtual 3D world known as Ever17 can be perceived and reached through the two different perspectives of Takeshi and Hokuto. Maybe I’m reading too deeply into this, but I feel that this also gives the story the message that “in the real world, by possessing and connecting two (diverse) mindsets, one can perceive a wider variety of things”.

As for Kaburaki… hmm, he stuck to his initial concept too… He was one of the masterminds (along with Yubiseiharukana) behind the 2034 incident, and the true mastermind. I quite like him. Burdened with a mission he must accomplish no matter what, he casually cracks jokes on the surface, but deep down, he possesses great tenacity. A man in the shadows, so to speak. If Takeshi and Hokuto are the heroes in the front bathing in the light, then Kaburaki is the dark hero hiding in the back. He grew to respect Takeshi in 2017 when he saw the way he lived his life. This is a bit off-topic, but in the Kid’s perspective (2034), there’s a bit where a security camera captures him with a beer, making a toast all by himself. It was a toast to Takeshi, who couldn’t bring in beer in 2017, therefore not getting to have a drink even when he wanted one. Kaburaki’s that kind of man.

#17. The story is written so that Takeshi ends up with Tsugumi. When you have a multi-heroine game like Ever17 with a true ending, what steps are taken during development to try to get players to favor the “canon” couple by the end?

Nakazawa:

Hmm, in Ever17, the protagonist ending up with a certain heroine was an essential part of the story, so we didn’t really do anything in particular to influence that… Though if I had to say something, the story is portrayed so that the protagonist ends up with the most fitting heroine that suits him and that the players can accept.

#18. Was the calendar trick chosen because there was a 17 year gap? Or was it vice-versa? The same trick would have worked with 6 years, 11 years, and 28 years as well.

Uchikoshi:

This is related to questions #1 and #2. First, I thought of the time gap trick. As I answered at #1, the number 17 was made a key number for the simple reason that my birthday was on the 17th. Furthermore, since the previous title was Never7, I thought going from “seven” to “seventeen” sounded good. Finally, I checked calendars. When I did, I found that just as you said, time gaps that had the same dates and days of the week were 6 years, 11 years, 17 years, and 28 years. 11 years was too short, while 28 years was too long. And so 17 years was used, thought to be honest, I had already been fixated on the number 17 before I checked the calendar. It just so happened that when I did, I found out a 17 year gap had the same days of the week. And the fact those years were 2017 and 2034 was also a coincidence! I don’t really want to say this because I’m sure you’re sick of hearing it already, but this was another result of the “inductive composition method”.

#19. The immortality granting Curé Virus has a huge influence on the overall plot as well. What was the reasoning behind its inclusion? Was it planned from the start that all the 2017 characters (excluding Sora) would be infected with it?

Uchikoshi:

I wrote this at Tsugumi’s section, but I came up with all the ideas in the reverse order than I normally do. First, I came up with Tsugumi being immortal, then I thought up the Curé Virus. The reason why is because I got the idea that “vampires are infected by a virus (those who get bit by vampires become vampires), aren’t they?”. Next, I thought up the time gap trick, then I considered how to make it work. Unless characters with the same physical form appeared in the past and future, it wouldn’t work. First, I considered Tsugumi. Luckily, she was immortal. “So far, so good. Tsugumi’s OK”. Next, I considered Sora. Lucky for her too, she was an AI. “Yes, Sora’s in the clear too!” I next considered You. Since there was two Yous, one being a clone, that was yet another lucky break. It was at this point I started getting scared. “W-Why… Why are all these backgrounds playing out so conveniently… *shiver*…” However, that was the end of my luck. No matter how hard I tried, neither Coco nor Sara could exist in the other world. I figured it’d be okay, as Coco only appeared in 2017 (though she appears as a ghostlike being a few times in 2034), while Sara could only appear in 2034. “Well, the player probably still won’t be able to figure it out…” The problem was Kaburaki. I forgot exactly how old Kaburaki was in 2017 (15, I think?), but he would have been in his 30s 17 years later. This was a problem. “What do I do? What do I do? Hmm… hmm…” Then suddenly, it hit me. “Oh, of course, I’ll just infect him with the Curé Virus!”… And that was how I came to decide to infect the rest of the 2017 characters with the Curé Virus.

#20. How did the conception of the Blick Winkel (protagonist = player) concept come about?

Uchikoshi:

Yet another question that’ll get long when I start talking… First of all, my first VN work was a VN called Memories Off. After I wrote that, I got a ton of criticism from players. “You don’t understand a thing about bishoujo games! The protagonist of bishoujo games is the player themselves!”. As a result of all that criticism, that phrase had quite a powerful impact on me and imprinted itself into my brain. “The protagonist of bishoujo games is the player themselves!” “The protagonist of bishoujo games is the player themselves!” “The protagonist of bishoujo games is the player themselves!”. And so that was the origin of it. Also, it was the book “Tertium Organum (by P.D. Ouspensky)” that made it convincing.

#21. Let’s discuss some lingering questions left over from Ever17 now. Never7 features Curé Syndrome, which, while I won’t go into details to avoid spoiling people on that game, requires firm belief to work. Is this “firm belief” required for the Curé Virus to work too? Is it related to how Takeshi revived at the bottom of the sea after he drowned, or why Tsugumi’s leg broke again in Takeshi’s Bad Ending?

Uchikoshi:

I think it’s related.

Nakazawa:

They both have the word “Curé”, so please go ahead and speculate.

#22. Was there ever meant to be any sort of significance behind the fact that Takeshi and Coco’s father have the same first name?

Uchikoshi:

I don’t really remember too well. Maybe? I’ll field this to Nakazawa!

Nakazawa:

Hmm… probably a coincidence.

#23. On the third day of the Kid’s perspective, Tsugumi and Sara suddenly get into a fight. Why was that?

Uchikoshi:

I don’t remember too well, but maybe it was a mother/daughter fight? Sara was pressing Tsugumi? I’ll field this to Nakazawa!

Nakazawa:

I think it was a a mother/daughter fight, yes. Sara realized that Tsugumi might be her mother. And so she misunderstood and thought Tsugumi had selfishly abandoned her father (Takeshi). Tsugumi didn’t say much, which made it easier to misunderstand. As shown in Coco’s Route, Sara is quite the daddy’s girl, which led her to shout at Tsugumi quite harshly. And thus the fight came about.

#24. In the story, it’s stated that Hokuto and Sara are not the actual names Tsugumi came up for them. Did you ever think up Hokuto and Sara’s real names? Or was it considered just a backstory detail and never actually considered?

Uchikoshi:

I think Tsugumi knows. I’m just a medium who transmitted a scenario that God wrote… I can’t transmit the names Tsugumi gave them, but I think they’re written in God’s scenario.

#25. What was the deal with the fluctuating life readings?

Uchikoshi:

What do you think it is? Thinking that is the theme of Ever17.

Nakazawa:

It’s not just Ever17: all the games of the Infinity series (Never7, Ever17, Remember11) were designed as “broadminded/open to speculation” works to allow multiple interpretations from users. That’s part of the reason why the series is called “Infinity”. When you saw that, “what” did you think? “What” did you intuitively feel it was? That’s correct. That’s the answer.

#26. Where did those ampules of TB medication Pipi kept producing come from?

Uchikoshi:

I’m sorry, I don’t remember… I’ll field this to Nakazawa.

Nakazawa:

I’m sorry, I don’t remember… I’ll leave that to the players’ speculations.

#27. What exactly was the significance behind that boy Tsugumi met at the Leiblich facility?

Uchikoshi:

I don’t feel like he had any significance, but I think I saw some interesting theories on fan speculation sites or something… I’ll field this to Nakazawa.

Nakazawa:

I’m sorry, I don’t remember… I think he was probably an incomplete Curé carrier test subject that Leiblich had incarcerated, though… I’ll leave that up to the players’ speculation.

#28. Were the robot Sora and the hologram of Sora from 2034 one in the same? Or were they separate beings? If it is the latter, did robot Sora also gain the memories of the 2034 Sora?

Uchikoshi:

Was this not written in the main story? That her memories were transferred from the terabyte disc?

Nakazawa:

It wasn’t directly stated, but after thinking it over a bit, they can be interpreted as the same person. The terabyte disc Takeshi used that Pipi carried to the outside world formed the consciousness of the 2034 Sora. She couldn’t access specific portions of memory so that the plan wouldn’t get revealed, but they were unlocked when Sara hacked LeMMIH and took it over, allowing the BW project to progress to its final stages. The memories of the robot Sora were transferred from HIMMEL to the surface (the transmission equipment was secretly still live in 2034). If their memories are the same, then are they the same person even if they have different bodies? This is a philosophical question, but in this case, the memories of the AI Sora (information) themselves are her main body, so there is no problem with interpreting them as one and the same.

#29. Why was Kaburaki alone and amnesiac in 2017?

Uchikoshi:

What do you believe? Thinking that is a theme of Ever17.

#30. Was there actual danger involved in the 2034 incident, or was it all an RSD simulation?

Uchikoshi:

I don’t think it was an illusion. There was actual danger.

Nakazawa:

I also interpreted and wrote the scenario as the danger being real. If all they had to do was imitate the incident to trick BW, couldn’t they have just faked it? Was it necessary for Yubiseiharukana to put her daughter and friends through such danger? Those are natural questions, but making it an illusion or faking it wouldn’t have worked. The reason why is because BW was possessing the Hokuto who was facing real danger in the 2034 incident. Repeating the same thing was the most important condition to summoning BW.

#31. What are the extent of Coco’s powers?

Uchikoshi:

The human mind.

#32. Finally, the biggest question everyone has always wondered… who kicked the can?! (laughs)

Uchikoshi:

Who indeed?

Nakazawa:

Who do you feel it is? That’s the answer.

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